Tag Archives: eegsynth

Motion capture system

For the EEGsynth project I have developed a full-body 8-channel motion capture system. It is based on the MPU9250 9-DOF inertial motion unit, which contains a three-axis accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer. I have combined this with the Madgwick AHRS algorithm, which takes the raw sensor data and computes the yaw, pitch and roll.

The design is based on one battery operated main unit that is worn for example in a Fanny pack around the waist, and up to 8 sensors that are attached to the arms, legs, etc.

The main unit contains a Wemos D1 mini, which is based on the ESP8266 module. It uses the TCA9548 I2C multiplexer to connect a maximum of 8 MPU9250 sensors.

The data from the IMU sensors is streamed using the Open Sound Control (OSC) format. The sampling rate that can be achieved with one sensor is around 200 Hz, the sampling rate for 8 sensors is around 60 Hz.

For initial configuration of the WiFi network it uses WiFiManager. After connecting to my local WiFi network, it has a web-server through which the configuration can be set, which includes the number of sensors and the destination host and port for the OSC UDP packets.

For the IMUs I am using MPU9250 modules that I purchased on Ebay for about 3 USD each.The MPU9250 units fit very nicely in a Hammond 1551MINI enclosure.

I designed the enclosure for the main unit in Fusion360 and printed it on my Prusa I3 MK3 3-D printer. I made two motion capture systems so far, one with black and one with white PLA filament.

The Arduino sketch and more technical documentation can be found here on GitHub.

Art-Net to DMX512 with ESP8266

Update 26 May 2017 – added photo’s of second exemplar and screen shots of web interface for OTA.

Professional stage and theatre lighting fixtures are mainly controlled over DMX512. To allow a convenient interface between the EEGsynth and this type of professional lighting systems, I built an Artnet-to-DMX512 converter. It quite closely follows the design of my Artnet-to-Neopixel LED strip module.

Let me first show the finished product. It has a 5 pin XLR connector, a 2.1 mm power connector, and a multi-color status LED:

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ESP-8266 Art-Net NeoPixel module

As explained in a previous post, for the EEGsynth we want to use a neopixel array that can be controlled wirelessly using the DMX512 protocol. I purchased a number of Adafruit neopixel rings with 12, 16 and 24 elements respectively. Each RGBW pixel contains a red, green, blue and white LED. For the 24-pixel ring that means that there are in total 4*24=96 LEDs of which the intensity can be set.

The ESP-8266 module is a versatile WiFi module that comes in many versions. During development I especially like the NodeMCU version, which mounts the ESP-12 module on a development board with USB connection, and the even smaller Wemos D1 mini board. The Wemos D1 mini is hardly more expensive on Ebay than the simpler bare-bone ESP-8266 modules.

The hardware connection is simple: I connected Vcc and GND directly to the Wemos D1 mini board, and connected pin D2 to the data-in of the first pixel. Although the Neopixels are specified for 5V, in my experience the Adafruit rings also work fine at 3.3V, both for power and for the serial control signal. Each LED can take up to 20 mA when fully bright, which means that all LEDs of the 24-pixel RGBW ring can take up to 24*4*20 = 1920 mA, or close to 2 A. However, not all LEDs will be at full intensity at the same time, and driving them with 3.3V rather than 5V further reduces the current. I encountered no issues powering them over the USB port of my MacBook.

For the EEGsynth we want to map a small number of control signals to aesthetically pleasing light effects. E.g. it can control the hue, the frequency with which the array flashes, or the speed with which a bright bar rotates along the ring.

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Scalable lighting systems

The X-mass holiday is always a nice time of the year to spend studying and tinkering on electronics projects. In the EEGsynth project we have identified that it would be cool to control light with brain and body signals, besides controlling modular synthesizers which we have focussed on so far. As it is not yet clear what kind of light and what kind of control will conceptually and aesthetically work well on the EEGsynth control signals, I have been studying both small and large lighting systems. We might for example want to use small and wearable lights on a performer, or control the stage light, or use a LED strip as indicator of the EEG-extracted control signals.

In theatrical and stage performance lighting there is a clearly dominant standard: DMX512. For lighting setups there are many fixtures (i.e. lamps rigged on ceiling mounted truss) that can be remotely controlled over DMX512, not only on-off, but they can be dimmed, the color can be changed, spotlights can be moved, etc. If you look on for example on Thomann, you’ll see that many light fixtures support DMX.

The Disco Biscuits – City Bisco – 10/5/12 – The Mann Center for the Performing Arts – Philadelphia, PA – Photo © Dave Vann 2012

Going to the smallest systems, I considered individual LEDs. Neopixels are a very interesting type of RGB LEDs, which combine a red, green and blue (and sometimes white) LED in a single few-mm small housing together with a controller chip. The controller chip allows the individual LED intensities of the neopixels to be addressed over a serial controller by a microcontroller such as an Arduino. Furthermore, multiple Neopixels can be daisy-chained, where each pixel in the array can be addressed. LED strips consisting of 30, 60 or even 144 pixels per meter can be purchased per meter, for example on Ebay.

Adafruit NeoPixel Ring with 16 x 5050 RGB LEDs with integrated drivers

For the the EEGsynth it is desirable to have a single control module that provides a uniform interface between ExG control signals and light control. An individual neopixel can be considered as an RGB lamp, just like a theatrical stage light. The intensity of the red, green and blue can be controlled, just like the DMX channels of a stage light. Controlling a small LED jewel worn by the performer should not be different than controlling the light of the stage on which the performer acts.

An important difference in the requirements for fixed stage lighting and a small wearable LED jewel is that the first must hook up to existing DMX512 cabling systems, whereas the second should be wireless. This is where Art-Net and the ESP-8266 come in. Art-Net is a protocol for sending the DMX control protocol over a network. The ESP-8266 is a small and low-cost microcontroller combined with a WiFi chip that is compatible with Arduino.

Further details on the hardware and firmware design for the actual light controller modules will come in a series of follow-up posts.

Raspberry Pi as Eurorack synthesizer module

Processing realtime EEG data from the OpenBCI system requires software running on a computer. For the EEGSynth project we do the rapid application development using the platforms that we are most familiar with, i.e. standard laptops and the FieldTrip toolbox, which is based on MATLAB. However, in the end we want to implement as much as possible using affordable and open hardware and software. Hence we opted for the Raspberry Pi, a credit card–sized single-board computer. It runs Linux, which makes it easy to use standard programming platforms and interfaces such as Python and Redis to implement the software stack.

In the first EEGSynth studio performance you can see Stephen in the middle, operating the MATLAB-based GUI for the EMG/EEG processing, and Jean-Louis at the back operating the synthesizer. The goal of the technological development is to put Jean-Louis completely in control and to make the interface of the EEG synthesizer as similar as his other modular synthesizer modules. Hence the need for fitting the Raspberry Pi into a Eurorack synthesizer case.

Here you can see some photo’s from the construction of the front panel.

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The front plate has holes for the various interface ports to interface with the Raspberry Pi. For a sturdy mount I glued a section of L-profile rails to the front plate.

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After mounting the Raspberry Pi, I connected the HDMI and audio port with a short cable to the front panel.

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Here you can see the Raspberry Pi in the Eurorack case, next to the power supply.

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Eurorack power supply

I am working on fitting a Raspberry Pi as a Eurorack module in the EEGSynth. A previous post shows the completed case. Besides the Raspberry Pi which needs 5V, it will also hold a CV/Gate controller and some other modules for interfacing between the digital and analog parts of the synthesizer. The operational amplifiers and some other ICs on those modules require a symmetric positive and negative rails.

As I am not planing any critical parts that require an very stable voltage (such as a VCO) in my enclosure, I decided not to go for an expensive linear power supply, but rather construct one myself on the basis of two 12V switching power supply that I salvaged from some old wall-warts that once served some external 3.5 inch USB hard disks. The AC-DC converters have the 220V side isolated from the 12V side. This allows to connect the positive DC rails of one to the negative DC rails of the other, resulting in +12V and -12V from either converter relative to the common ground.

The Raspberry Pi requires quite a bit of current compared to most synthesizer modules, hence converting the 12V into 5V with a voltage regulator such as the L7805 would not be very efficient. Therefore I also added a 5V 2A AC-DC converter.

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For safety I made a small plexiglass enclosure using the laser cutter at the Techlab Nijmegen. All electronics, except for the connector, switch and three LEDs are completely enclosed behind the aluminum front panel.

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The connector with the synthesizer modules consists of a flat cable, wired according to the A-100 system bus.

The LEDs show the status for each of the three voltage levels. Surprising is to see that it takes a good 10 seconds for the capacitors of the +12V and -12V to completely drain when switching the power off.