Category Archives: Electronics

Mixing multiple microphones for hybrid meetings

Behringer MX400 as summing mixer

During the last 1.5 year I have been working mostly from home, as all of my direct colleagues. Initially it took us some time getting used to doing our group meetings online, but by now we know how to make those pleasant, inclusive and efficient. Now that many people are vaccinated, we expect/hope that we’ll soon be able to get back to the university for work. However, there are a few aspects of online meetings that I value and hope to can maintain. The travel time is much less, making it easier to quickly join a meeting that otherwise would be held on the other side of campus. It is rather trivial to have people join from abroad, e.g. previous colleagues that want to keep their connection and contribute to the Donders knowledge and culture. Everyone can share their screen much easier. The chat is used to post background material, links to relevant papers, etc. Consequently, I expect that we will not all of a sudden switch back to in real-life meetings, but rather we will have a (possibly infinite) period in which some people attend in real-life, and others online.

In our MEG meeting and the hackathon we have experimented with different aspects of hybrid meetings and documented our findings. We quickly learned that to ensure lively discussions, real-life and online attendees should be able to hear each very well. Spontaneously talk between live participants is easy, but the online participants should be able to hear everything without extra strain and be able to chime in.

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Using the Bela to measure the frequency response

Bela is a maker platform for creating beautiful interactions. It consists of a Beaglebone black, with a shield or hat that has 2 audio inputs, 2 audio outputs, 8 analog inputs, and 8 analog outputs. It is complemented with a very slick web interface that allows you to write and very easily compile and run your code. And very cool is that the web interface features an oscilloscope.

I am planning to build a purely analog EEC/EMG/ECG amplifier, similar to this design on Instructables. As that involves making choices on the filter settings: a low-pass filter to remove electrode drift, a notch filter for line noise, high-pass anti-aliasing filter matched to audible frequencies. Hence I started thinking on how to determine the combined effect of all those filters, together with the multiple amplifier stages. It occurred to me that the Bela can act both as a signal generator and as a digital recorder and oscilloscope.

Bela and breadboard with fiter

On this GitHub page I am sharing a Bela project that outputs a sine wave on the analog output, which can be fed through an external circuit, and subsequently measured using the analog inputs. The project computes a real-time discrete Fourier transform of the output signal and compares the amplitude and phase to the input signal. Using a LaunchControl XL MIDI controller (or alternatively using a small EEGsynth path for an on-screen MIDI controller), I can select the frequency, and start/stop a sweep over the whole frequency range. The amplitude and phase response at each frequency is logged to disk.

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12 Volt trigger for NAD-D3020 amplifier

Update 3 January 2021 – mention that I am now using Tasmota firmware.

The NAD D3020 is a hybrid digital audio amplifier with a combination of analog and digital inputs. I have been using it for quite some years now to play the sound of my Samsung smart TV over the living room speakers and for digital radio, iTunes and Spotify from my Mac mini. The Samsung is connected with an optical Toslink cable, the Mac mini is connected with a USB cable.

In the way the D3020 is placed in our media cabinet, its on/off button is not so easy to access. The D3020 remote control is really crappy and I find it anyway annoying to have to use multiple remotes to switch the power of all devices. Also, the status LEDs of the D3020 are dim and got considerably worse over time, especially for the OPT1 and the USB inputs that are for the TV and the Mac mini, and hence on most of the time. I guess that it uses OLEDs, which have degraded over time. Consequently, it happened quite often that we forgot to switch the amplifier off for the night.

However, the D3020 features a 12V trigger input port which allows the amplifier to be switched automatically on/off along with other gear. Of course, neither TV nor the Mac mini has a 12V output port, but both are connected to my home network; hence it is possible to detect over the network whether these are powered on.

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Timing and jitter in DMX512 signals

My previous post on building an Art-Net to DMX interface using an ESP8266 seems to be getting a lot of attention. However, from the comments it is clear that a lot of people that build it themselves have difficulties to get it to work, or don’t get it to work at all. This post investigates this in more detail.

We have not been using these interfaces in our performances for quite some time, and started wondering whether there is something wrong my firmware. My implementation goes back to April 2017. Over the course of time there have been some updates to my code. Furthermore, the Arduino IDE has been updated, as well as the ESP8266 core for Arduino.

Recently I received all three interfaces back that I had built for my 1+1=3 collaborators and decided to update the firmware and to test them. One of them did not work at all due to a broken connection between the power supply and the Wemos D1 mini; two of them started just fine. After fixing the broken wire and updating the firmware on all three of them; they started up just fine, showing the green light (indicating a connection to the WiFi network) and on the monitor page of the web interface I cold see that Art-Net packets were being received. However, with my DMX controlled light it did not work at all.

Testing and initial diagnosis

Using an Enttec Open DMX interface and the very nice JV Lightning DmxControl software (which supports both Art-Net and the Enttec Open DMX), I set out to debug the issue. Since DMX is all about timing, I connected my DS203 mini oscilloscope to pin 2 and 3 of the DMX connector.

I found detailed schematic information about the timing of the DMX protocol on this page. Searching for oscilloscope images of DMX signals, I also found this page with information.

Comparing the output voltage with the DMX512 schematics, it became clear that something was wrong in the signal. To make it easier to see the full signal on the oscilloscope, I configured only three DMX output channels, all set to zero. The oscilloscope shows 5 similar blocks; changing the value for DMX channel 1, I see that the 3rd block changes – that is apparently the first channel. Prior to that should be a “start code” with value 0, so the last 4 blocks make sense. But the first block is too short; there is also a very short pulse all the way at the start which does not match the specification.

Output voltage with the initial firmware:

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PCB etching with HCl and H2O2

As my electronics designs are getting more complex and my patience for soldering air-wires for all connections on a perfboard is decreasing, I started looking into making my own PCBs. Although there are professional PCB fabrication companies that are not very expensive, I am not so confident yet with my Eagle PCB design skills. Hence I decided to start fabricating some simple PCB boards myself to get a better insight in all aspects relevant for PCB boards.

Reading about the different options for etching PCBs, and following a instruction evening organized at the Hackerspace Nijmegen on using a small CNC mill for PCB fabrication, I opted for toner transfer using a laser printer and using HCl and H2O2 as described here.

My first attempt was with 10% HCl from the local hardware store (dat zeg ik, Gamma!) and 3% peroxide from the drugstore. Directly following mixing, etching went OK-ish, but rather slow. It took some 10 minutes for the 1-sided PCB board to be clean. The etchant turned into a nice green color. The second time (a month later) the etchant would not really work any more, and th ePCB only got dark. Rejuvenating the solution with some additional H2O2 as per instruction did not change anything. I guess the concentrations were too low, and after a few hours I abandoned the attempt and took the board out.

For the second attempt I ordered 30% Hcl and 10% peroxide in an online store. Using my old etchant solution, I diluted the H2O2 to approximately 3% and mixed that with the HCl in a 2:1 ratio (adding the acid to the HO2O, to prevent a strong exothermic reaction). I popped in my board (from the previous attempt, which had gotten quite dark). The result was a very nice etching process. The process was clearly visible and there were no bubbles.

You can see that half of the copper of the PCB board has been etched away

The result of the etching is quite nice.

Resulting PCB board. It is about 2×3 cm large and will contain a 6 pin DIP optocoupler with some resistors and a diode to implement a MIDI filter.

I am happy with the result of the etching. The ill-defined traces on the board are due to poor toner transfer; I had to make some corrections with a permanent marker (fine liner) on the board. Measuring the connection between all pads revealed that there was one short-circuit (on the left side of the board). I was able to remove that with an x-acto knife.

The next time I will design the traces in Eagle to be slightly wider and to have more space between them. In the Eagle design rules I used a 6 mil minimum trace width (the default), and a 12 mil clearance. And I have to practice more with the toner transfer… to be continued.

Restoring the AT firmware on the ESP8266

Most of the time I am using Wemos D1 mini development boards in combination with the Arduino IDE to make my own firmware to run directly on the ESP8266 chip. But I also have some bare ESP-01 and ESP-12 modules lying around, and recently I came up with the plan to use one of them.

The specific project requires very well controlled timing of an ADC, for which I will use a regular ATmega328P-based Arduino board. In this project the ESP8266 will only be used to transmit the data over WiFi. Neither my ESP-01, not my ESP-12 still have the original AT firmware, since I have been experimenting with various other firmwares.

This is where the challenge starts, since my plan required restoring my ESP-12 to the AT firmware and use a library like ESP8266wifi or WiFiEsp. I realize that I have been struggling with different firmwares before, hence this post to give a short review and to keep some notes for my own future reference.

Module form factor

The ESP8266 microchip comes on various development boards that include an USB interface, such as the Wemos D1 Mini and the NodeMCU board, but also as bare modules such as the ESP-01, 02, etc. This page on the ESP8266 wiki has an overview of all modules and this page has comparison of some of the raw modules with some of the development boards.

ESP-01 module:

ESP-12 module:

Flash memory capacity

Besides the number of GPIO pins that is exposed by each of the modules, another important feature is their flash memory capacity. The AI-Thinker website has a module list table that includes this. The ESP-01 module comes with 512kB flash (old modules) or 1MB (now more common). The ESP-12 module comes with 4MB. Note that there are development boards such as the Wemos D1 mini pro that even have more.

Firmware

As the ESP8266 is nowadays fully supported in the Arduino IDE, I prefer to develop my own custom firmware for the ESP8266 using C/C++ and the Arduino IDE and libraries. So the most confusing aspect of the ESP8266 for me is that there are multiple “standard” firmwares available for it, which I often accidentally confuse. These include

  • The AT firmware, comparable to the Hayes command set on old modems.
  • The NodeMCU firmware, which includes a LUA interpreter.
  • The MicroPython firmware, which includes a Python interpreter.
  • The Espruino firmware, which includes a JavaScript interpreter.

For the firmware options that include a Python or a JavaScript interpreter it should be mentioned that there are other versions from other companies/projects.

The NodeMCU project is more centrally managed/organized and includes a website where you can compile customized firmwares with support for specific hardware add-ons.

Restoring the AT firmware

To flash the firmware to an ESP8266, you will need to wire it up and get it in the right boot loader mode. There are many online tutorials for this and I won’t elaborate here. You will also need software to write the new firmware, I am exclusively using esptool.py.

I tried various options to flash my ESP-12 with the original firmware, most of which failed. The challenge is to figure out which firmware is compatible with my specific module, and to which flash memory locations to write the different pieces of the firmware. In the next section I will describe three things that worked, going from the oldest to most recent firmware versions.

Following the instructions here and using a rather obscure version of the firmware contained in a single binary file from here, I had success with:

esptool.py --port /dev/tty.usbserial-FTG54BPS --baud 115200 write_flash --flash_mode dio 0x00000 v0.9.2.2\ AT\ Firmware.bin

Subsequently I was able to connect in a terminal program with 9600 bps and got

[System Ready, Vendor:www.ai-thinker.com]
AT+GMR

0018000902

OK

Using the old AT firmware from Espressif itself with the “Offical ESP8266 AT+ Commands” from their old GitHub repository I was also able to get it to work with:

esptool.py --port /dev/tty.usbserial-FTG54BPS --baud 115200 write_flash --flash_mode dio 0x00000 boot_v1.1.bin
esptool.py --port /dev/tty.usbserial-FTG54BPS --baud 115200 write_flash --flash_mode dio 0x01000 newest/user1.bin
esptool.py --port /dev/tty.usbserial-FTG54BPS --baud 115200 write_flash --flash_mode dio 0x7C000 esp_init_data_default.bin
esptool.py --port /dev/tty.usbserial-FTG54BPS --baud 115200 write_flash --flash_mode dio 0x7E000 blank.bin

Subsequently I was able to connect in a terminal program with 115200 bps and got

ready
AT+GMR

00200.9.4

OK

The Espressif ESP8266 SDK Getting Started Guide contains the most recent information about the layout of the flash memory. Using the 2.2.1 release from the Espressif NONOS_SDK repository and

esptool.py --port /dev/tty.usbserial-FTG54BPS --baud 115200 write_flash --flash_mode dio 0x00000 boot_v1.2.bin
esptool.py --port /dev/tty.usbserial-FTG54BPS --baud 115200 write_flash --flash_mode dio 0x01000 at/512+512/user1.1024.new.2.bin
esptool.py --port /dev/tty.usbserial-FTG54BPS --baud 115200 write_flash --flash_mode dio 0x7C000 esp_init_data_default_v05.bin
esptool.py --port /dev/tty.usbserial-FTG54BPS --baud 115200 write_flash --flash_mode dio 0x7E000 blank.bin

I also had success and was able to connect in a terminal program with 115200 bps. This resulted in the following response

ready
AT+GMR
AT version:1.6.2.0(Apr 13 2018 11:10:59)
SDK version:2.2.1(6ab97e9)
compile time:Jun 7 2018 19:34:26
Bin version(Wroom 02):1.6.2

I did not have success with the 3.0 release from the Espressif NONOS_SDK repository. That one does not have the “512+512” directory, only the “1024+1024” directory, which I could not get to work on my ESP-12. Suggestions to make this work are welcome.

Motion capture system

For the EEGsynth project I have developed a full-body 8-channel motion capture system. It is based on the MPU9250 9-DOF inertial motion unit, which contains a three-axis accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer. I have combined this with the Madgwick AHRS algorithm, which takes the raw sensor data and computes the yaw, pitch and roll.

The design is based on one battery operated main unit that is worn for example in a Fanny pack around the waist, and up to 8 sensors that are attached to the arms, legs, etc.

The main unit contains a Wemos D1 mini, which is based on the ESP8266 module. It uses the TCA9548 I2C multiplexer to connect a maximum of 8 MPU9250 sensors.

The data from the IMU sensors is streamed using the Open Sound Control (OSC) format. The sampling rate that can be achieved with one sensor is around 200 Hz, the sampling rate for 8 sensors is around 60 Hz.

For initial configuration of the WiFi network it uses WiFiManager. After connecting to my local WiFi network, it has a web-server through which the configuration can be set, which includes the number of sensors and the destination host and port for the OSC UDP packets.

For the IMUs I am using MPU9250 modules that I purchased on Ebay for about 3 USD each.The MPU9250 units fit very nicely in a Hammond 1551MINI enclosure.

I designed the enclosure for the main unit in Fusion360 and printed it on my Prusa I3 MK3 3-D printer. I made two motion capture systems so far, one with black and one with white PLA filament.

The Arduino sketch and more technical documentation can be found here on GitHub.

Configuring Multitech MDOT for TTN

I have a Multitech MDOT-BOX for testing. Configuring it for TTN requires the following connection to a computer, after which AT commands can be used to probe and set parameters. The following resets the MDOT to factory defaults and shows the configuration overview.

AT&F
AT&V

Firmware: 		2.0.0
Library : 		0.0.9-14-g4845711
Device ID:		00:80:00:00:00:00:b3:76
Frequency Band:		FB_868
Public Network:		off
Network Address:	00000000
Network ID:		6c:4e:ef:66:f4:79:86:a6
Network ID Passphrase:	MultiTech
Network Key:		1f.33.a1.70.a5.f1.fd.a0.ab.69.7a.ae.2b.95.91.6b
Network Key Passphrase:	MultiTech
Network Session Key:	00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00
Data Session Key:	00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00.00
Network Join Mode:	OTA
Tx Data Rate:		SF_7
Tx Power:		11
Log Level:		6
Maximum Size:		242
Minimum Size:		11
Maximum Power:		20
Minimum Power:		2
Data:			0

After adding a device to application page on the TTN console with OTA activation, the following identifiers/keys are listed on the TTN console page for the device

Device EUI
Application EUI
App Key
Device Address
Network Session Key
App Session Key

From the Multitech documentation: In OTA mode, the device only needs to be configured with a network name (+NI=1,name) and network passphrase (+NK=1,passphrase). The network session key, data session key, and network address are all automatically configured.

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Art-Net to DMX512 with ESP8266

Update 1 August 2019 – added the connectors to the list of components.

Update 4 July 2019 – You may also want to check out this instructable, which describes a more sophisticated ESP8266-based solution.

Update 6 April 2019 – I wrote a follow up post on the timing and jitter in DMX512 signals and fixed a bug in the firmware.

Update 26 May 2017 – added photo’s of second exemplar and screen shots of web interface for OTA.

Update 3 Sept 2022 – the code has moved to its own esp8266_artnet_dmx512 repository to improve the timing and jitter with I2S (following this comment).

Professional stage and theatre lighting fixtures are mainly controlled over DMX512. To allow a convenient interface between the EEGsynth and this type of professional lighting systems, I built an Artnet-to-DMX512 converter. It quite closely follows the design of my Artnet-to-Neopixel LED strip module.

Let me first show the finished product. It has a 5 pin XLR connector, a 2.1 mm power connector, and a multi-color status LED:

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GPS-enabled LoRaWAN temperature sensor

Together with the TTN Nijmegen community we are discussing possible applications of remote sensing nodes in Nijmegen. To get a better view on the TTN coverage in Nijmegen and to get a feel for what works (and what not), we are working on the implementation of some nodes.

The PoC2 TTN gateway will soon be installed by Michiel Nijssen at Maptools in Molenhoek. To help Michiel get started, we agreed that I would give him a fully functional node to play with. Michiel came up with a very concrete idea: it consists of a GPS-enabled temperature sensor that sends the data over LoRaWAN/TTN. Below you can find some details of a very fist implementation.

The node consists of

  • Teensy 3.2 MCU board
  • Dorji LoRa module
  • DS18b20 temperature sensor
  • Ublox NEO-M8N GPS module
  • 4k7 ohm resistor
  • small LED and 200 ohm resistor (not on photo)

I estimate that the material costs amount to 50 euro. It still needs to be soldered in a more sturdy form-factor and a battery and enclosure need to be added.

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