The Nike EEG headband

Together with Stephen Whitmarsh and friends I have embarked on the EEGSynth project, which aims to bridge science, technology and art by making an EEG-based synthesizer. The EEGSynth project relies on the realtime functionality in our FieldTrip toolbox, although it will probably also be linked to other software platforms.

I am lucky to have one of the first Jinga-Hi JAGA16 wireless EEG systems, which I think is the the smallest and most portable EEG system in existence at the moment. Although the primary application of that system is not for human EEG, it actually is perfectly suited for wireless BCI and neurofeedback applications as well. I am combining this system with standard (clinical and research) EEG cup electrodes. Using a glob of Ten20 electrode paste you can stick them to the scalp. Having some of these electrodes on my head and trying to connect this bunch of long wires to the tiny JAGA16 wireless EEG amplifier resulted in the question how to make a comfortable and robust system for electrode attachment.

I came up with the idea to use an elastic sports headband. This allows to attach the wireless amplifier to the head, and consequently the electrode wires would be channeled along the headband. Here you can see the components that I started with (minus the EEG amplifier):

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The headband is one that I picked up in a local sports shop. It consists of a sleeve of flexible fabric that  is relatively thin. At the placed where the fabric needed puncturing, I used some iron-on interfacing to strengthen it and prevent the holes from further tearing.

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This is the end result, which includes 8 electrodes for the EEG and 2 for the ground and reference.

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Soldering the electrode leads to the miniature connector was the hardest task. The 18 pin (arranged as 9×2) connector is only 12 mm wide, which means that for each pin there is only about 1.2 mm space.

Note that the PCB board with the yellow wrapping is actually  the full 16 channel wireless amplifier. It is powered by a (cell-phone type) LiPo battery, which is as large as the EEG system. Data is transmitted over Wifi and can be streamed and analysed in MATLAB or Python using  FieldTrip.

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Here I am, wearing the first prototype electrode headband. Two electrodes (ground and reference) go behind the ears, the other eight electrodes are approximately placed at F3, F4, C3, C4, P3, P4, FCz and CPz. The wifi EEG amplifier and the battery can conveniently be tucked away in the two flaps at the back.

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